Upcoming Events

A Faculty Development Workshop: Japan’s Cultural Pivots Workshop

Pre-workshop Meetings: June 12–14| Main Workshop Meetings: June 18–22


Pre-workshop Meetings: June 12–14, 2019

The June 12–14 meetings are designed primarily for local faculty. They provide an introduction to Japanese studies in intercultural contexts. This interdisciplinary workshop shares teaching approaches and materials in art, religious studies, historical narrative, poetry, prose, and drama. Note: The “Main Workshop” occurs on the following week, June l8–22. Faculty have been invited to take part either week or both. 

Date 

Event Details for Pre-workshop Meetings

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 

Location: Community College of Philadelphia, CBI Building l8th and Callowhill streets, Room C2-28


10:15 to 10:30 a.m. | Introductions of Participants and Ideas 
Overview of chronology and concept of Culture Pivots—Key times of change in values and practices in Japanese history. Introduction to the first pivot when Buddhism, writing, etc. were introduced to Japan from Korea c. 550 CE.

 

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. |  Frank Chance, adjunct associate professor at University of Pennsylvania
Lecture: Learning about Buddhism through Early Korean and Japanese Art.

 

11:40 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. |  David Prejsnar, coordinator for Religious Studies at Community College of Philadelphia
Lecture: Early Buddhism in JapanThe Asuka Period (538-710 CE) through the Prism of Prince Shotoku and His Temples.

 

12:45 to 2:00 p.m. | Lunch break
King of Tandoor Restaurant (1824 Callowhill Street) is recommended.

 

2:15 to 2:45 p.m. | Fay Beauchamp, professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia
From China: The High Esteem for Poetry in Confucian Thought. Comparing Paragraphs from the Prefaces to the Chinese Book of Odes and the Japanese Kokinshu. Handout will be provided.

 

2:45 to 4:00 p.m. | William Lowe, associate professor of English at Howard Community College
Lecture and discussion: Introduction to Early Japanese PoetryViewing Japan through “Ten Thousand Leaves”: Themes and Forms of the Manyoshu. Handout will be provided.

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Location: Community College of Philadelphia, CBI Building l8th and Callowhill streets, Room C2-28


9:30 to 10:30 a.m. | Fay Beauchamp, professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia
Historical Tales from China that Influenced Murasaki Shikibu’s The Tale of Genji. Chinese Background of The Tale of Genji, Chapter One. Subtopics: 1) Women in the Tang Dynasty (618–907): Empress Wu: Buddhism, Bodhisattvas and Court Women; 2) Uprising from Central Asian Ethnic Groups: The An LuShan Rebellion of 755 and Lady Yang Guifei.

 

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. | Ching-Hsuan Wu, associate professor of Applied Linguistics at West Virginia University, and Fay Beauchamp, professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia
Bai Juyi’s Narrative Poem about the An LuShan Rebellion and Yang Guifei, “Song of Everlasting Sorrow/Regret;” Introduction of Murasaki’s Use of Bai Juyi’s Poem in The Tale of Genji, Chapter One.

 

11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. | Lunch Break 
During lunch, we will debate the innocence of Yang Guifei, who was blamed for the An LuShan Rebellion and throttled!

 

1:00 to 2:30 p.m. | Fay Beauchamp, professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia
Bai Juyi’s “Song of the Lute” and Genji – Akashi Chapter 13: Themes of Exile, Love and Longing. Introduction followed by discussion.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Location: University of Pennsylvania, Williams Hall, 255 S. 36th Street, Room 543, Cherpack Lounge


9:30 to 11:00 a.m. | Maggie Ivanova, senior lecturer of Drama at Flinders University in Australia
Introduction to Japan’s Performing Arts: Noh and Kabuki! A Tale of Escape and Loyalty Transforms from a Noh play, “Ataka” of 1465, to an Exuberant Kabuki Play of 1840.

 

11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Paula Behrens, professor of Architecture, Design and Construction at Community College of Philadelphia 
Presentation: “An Account of My Hut” (1212 CE). A famous and beautiful essay conveys the Buddhist concept of impermanence, written by the court poet Chomei who became a Buddhist monk.

 

12:15 to 1:30 p.m. | Lunch Break and Discussion
Penn will provide a light lunch.

 

1:30 to 2:30 p.m. | Akiko Mori, adjunct professor of Japanese Language, and Study Abroad leader to Japan at Community College of Philadelphia
Presentation: Introduction to Japanese Writing Systems and Calligraphy as a Japanese Art Form.

 

2:30 to 3:00 p.m. | Wrap-up Panel Discussion
Literature, Aesthetics and the Creation of National Identity—Pivotal Changes or Resilient Continuities?

 

Main Workshop Meetings: June 18–22, 2019

Date

Event Details for Main Workshop Meetings

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

MORNING SESSION
Location: Community College of Philadelphia, CBI Building l8th and Callowhill streets, Room C2-28.


10:00 to 11:00 a.m. | Tour led by Frank Chance, adjunct associate professor at University of Pennsylvania
This world-famous collection of East Asian art prepares participants to see a sample of Japanese artworks created before the influence of Chinese and Korean cultures after 550 CE. Tour of the Asian Galleries, particularly the remarkable collection of the Chinese Rotunda.

 

11:00 a.m. | Break Into Two Groups


Group 1 
11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Room MW-110

A special showing of artifacts from Japan’s Jomon pre-historical period and pieces of Korean art.

12:00 to 1:00 p.m. | Lunch
The pleasant Museum cafeteria is recommended.

 

Group 2
11 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Lunch
Break for lunch or view other galleries.

12:00 to 1:00 p.m. | Room MW-110
A special showing of artifacts from Japan’s Jomon pre-historical period and pieces of Korean art.

 

AFTERNOON SESSION
Location: University of Pennsylvania, Williams Hall, Room 5 255 S. 36th Street (four blocks west of the Museum) Cherpack Lounge, Room 543


1:00 to 1:30 p.m. | Light refreshments will be available.


1:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m | Joseph Overton, president of the Japan Studies Association 
Introductions and Welcome. We will quickly discuss the concept of Japanese Cultural Pivots—external influences vs. internal conflict leading to significant change.

 

1:45 to 2:45 p.m. | Frank Chance, adjunct associate professor at University of Pennsylvania
Lecture: Three Kingdoms, Two Empires and a Federation: Learning about 6th and 7th Century ChineseKorean-Japanese Interactions through the Evidence of Ceramic Art.

 

2:50 to 3:50 p.m. | Linda Chance, associate professor of Japanese Literature at University of Pennsylvania
Lecture: Echoes of the Latter Days: Pivoting from The Tale of Genji to the Tale of the Heike. Subtopics: 1) Heian Japan: From Capital of Peace to Battles in the Street; 2) The Heike Leader Kiyomori and His Wife Kenreimon-in: From Glory to Story.

 

4:00 to 5:00 p.m. | Linda Chance, associate professor of Japanese Literature at University of Pennsylvania
Presentation and Discussion: A Focus on the Effect of the Heike-Minamoto Civil War on a Woman, Kenreimon-in, in History and Literature.

 

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. | Reception and Light Supper
Location: Fay Beauchamp’s House (4424 Larchwood Ave).

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Location: Community College of Philadelphia, CBI Building l8th and Callowhill streets, Room C2-28.


9:15 to 10:15 a.m. | Linda Chance, associate professor of Japanese Literature at University of Pennsylvania
How the Tales of the Heike Were ToldA Biwa (Lute) Demonstration


10:20 to 11: 20 a.m. | Linda Chance, associate professor of Japanese Literature at University of Pennsylvania
Lecture: The Minamoto Military Leader Yoshitsune—Tales of Leadership and Readership


11:20 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Discussion
What cultural values does Yoshitsune illustrate in passages from the 14th century written Tale of the Heike, such as “First Across the Uji River,” “The Charge Down Hiyodori Ravine,” “The Death of Tsuginobu” and “The Dropped Bow.” Passages translated by Royall Tyler, 2014, posted on the JSA website.


12:00 to 1:00 p.m. | Break and/or Continued Discussion in Groups
A light lunch will be provided.


1:15 to 2:15 p.m.. | Linda Chance, associate professor of Japanese Literature at University of Pennsylvania
Presentation and Discussion: A Focus on the Effect of the Heike-Minamoto Civil War on a Woman, Kenreimon-in, in History and Literature.


2:15 to 3:15 p.m. |  Maggie Ivanova, senior lecturer of Drama at Flinders University in Australia
Lecture: Reinvention and Replay: “Yoshitsune and the Thousand Cherry Trees” in Bunraku (1747) and Kabuki (1748). Afterlives in Theatre, Film, Anime and Manga. Showing how Minamoto no Yoshitsune transforms into a cultural legend and a romantic tragic hero, a popular tale dramatizes an invented incident of two faithful followers, Benkei and Yoshitsune’s lover, Shizuka.


3:30 to 4:30 p.m. | Frank Chance, adjunct associate professor at University of Pennsylvania
Lecture: Japanese Woodblock Prints and Y oshitoshi’s Innovations at a Time of Rapid Change. This lecture will prepare the audience for the Yoshitoshi special exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.


4:30 to 5:l5 p.m. | Michael Stern, assistant professor of  Architecture, Design and Construction at Community College of Philadelphia
Walking tour from the College to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.


5:30 p.m. | Philadelphia Museum of Art
Viewing of the Yoshitoshi Exhibit and the Japanese and Chinese exhibits at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. This will include the Japanese Teahouse “Evanescent Joy.”

 

Dinner on your own. Restaurant recommendations will be given.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Location: Community College of Philadelphia, CBI Building 18th and Callowhill streets, Room C2-28


9–9:10 a.m.  | Joseph Overton, president of the Japan Studies Association 
Introduction of the speaker.


9:10–10:45 a.m | Van C. Gessel, professor and former Dean of Brigham Young University College of Humanities, and renowned translator of modern Japanese literature
Lecture: 1600–1868 — From Civil War to Unification and Social Stratification. The lecture will discuss unification of Japan c. 1600, introduction of Christianity, Tokugawa social/political system, merchant class culture, Basho: haiku and Chikamatsu: love suicide plays

 

10:45 to 11:00 a.m.  |  Break


11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. |  Van C. Gessel, professor and former Dean of Brigham Young University College of Humanities
Lecture: 1597–1868 — Isolation and Rejection of Western Influence. The anti-Christian edicts and persecution. Introduction of Endo Shusaku and Silence.


12:15 to 1:15 p.m. |  Lunch at the Rose Tattoo (1847 Callowhill Street)


1:30 to 2:30 p.m. | Silence
Discussion and break-out groups.

 

2:30 to 2:45 p.m. | Break


2:45 to 4:00 p.m. | Scorsese’s “Silence”
Film clips and discussion Dinner Chinatown. Restaurant TBA. *Readings are available on the JSA protected website.

Friday, June 21, 2019

Location: University of Pennsylvania, Williams Hall, Room TBA


9:00 to 10:30 a.m. |  Van C. Gessel, professor and former dean of Brigham Young University College of Humanities
Lecture and Discussion: 1868-1930 — The Opening of the Country and Modernization. The Meiji period and the return of the West. Readings: Mori Ogai, “The Dancing Girl.” Natsume Soseki, "Kokoro." First published in serial form l914. An excerpt from the conclusion is available to participants. The conclusion takes place at a pivotal time when the Meiji Emperor dies in l912.

 

10:30 to 10:45 a.m. | Break


10:45 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. | Van C. Gessel, professor and former Dean of Brigham Young University College of Humanities
Lecture and Discussion: 1930-1952 — The War, the Bombing, the Defeat.
Requested reading: Endo Shusaku, Sachiko (excerpts); Ota Yoko, “Fireflies;” and Hayashi Fumiko, “Downtown”* (first published l948; the 1962 translation by Ivan Morris will be made available). Suggested reading: Ibuse Masuji, Black Rain, a novel based on historical records of survivors of the Hiroshima bombing. Readings are available on the JSA protected website.

 

12:00 to 1:00 p.m.  | Lunch
Provided at University of Pennsylvania, Williams Hall Cherpack Lounge, Room 543 (5th Floor)


1:00 to 1:45 p.m. |  Frank Chance, adjunct associate professor at University of Pennsylvania
Presentation: Pine BreezesPhiladelphia’s Japanese House and Garden in Historical Contexts

 

1:50 p.m. | Travel to Shofuso House in Fairmount Park

Saturday, June 22, 2019

Location: Williams Hall, University of Pennsylvania, Cherpack Lounge, Room 543
*This final morning of the workshop explores the impact of Japan’s l910-1945 Colonization of Korea.


9:00 to 9:30 a.m. | Seok Lee, associate director of Korean Studies Center at University of Pennsylvania.
Lecture: Popular Culture and Colonial Modernity in Korea. This presentation explores the multilayered nature of popular culture in colonial Korea beyond the nationalist historical narratives based on dichotomous interpretations of the period as “imperialist repression versus nationalist resistance.” We will employ the three variables of colonialism, nationalism and modernity, which affected popular culture in colonial Korea in complex ways.

 

11:00 to 11:45 a.m | Jennifer Welsh, associate professor of History at Lindenwood-Belleville University in Illinois
Discussion of the period of Japanese colonization of Korea and today’s Korean-Japanese relationships and its impact.

 

11:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. | Wrap-Up Discussion of the Concept of Cultural Pivots as Applied to Japanese History

 

12:30 to 1:00 p.m. | Facilitators: Aiden Kosciesza, assistant professor of English, Community College of Philadelphia; Fay Beauchamp, professor of English at Community College of Philadelphia; and Stacia Bensyl, Chair and professor of English at Missouri Western University
Discussion of Course Modules: Faculty will receive their stipends from Penn’s Center for East Asian Studies, ARCAS or JSA.

Learn more about Japan's Cultural Pivots Workshop.