Thriving at the College as a Bucknell Scholar and SGA President

Moriah Lit has a message for nontraditional students interested in pursuing an education: Trust in yourself and in the academic excellence and support services provided by the College.

She enrolled at the College on a whim because she wanted more. Starting with Foundational English and math courses, she was unsure if she would be successful.

“I did well, so I decided to take more classes,” she said.

Moriah is now working toward a degree in education, with the goal of becoming a counselor and maybe one day working at the College.

“I’m drawn to helping people with their educational future,” she said.

Her hard work and dedication have led to being selected as a Bucknell Scholar for June 2021. The initiative provides select community college students with attendance to a free, on-campus, six-week summer session. This prestigious program requires applicants to carry a 3.5 GPA or higher, and scholars are invited to apply for transfer to Bucknell upon earning their associate degree. If admitted, each scholar receives full tuition for two years.

On another spur of the moment decision last fall, Moriah joined other students in running for positions in the Student Government Association (SGA) , and she was elected president by her peers. She will use her leadership skills to bring together student ideas and suggestions that can further shape the college experience for themselves and others.

Another priority as SGA president is informing students about the multitude of support services at the College, which helped further her academic journey.

“The College has amazing professors. There are many underutilized resources on campus—I want to shine a light on them. I’m active in the Center for Collegiate Recovery. There are counselors, advisors and the Computer Center and Snack Rack food pantry. Single Stop is amazing. Tutors in the Learning Labs are phenomenal. CCP has all of the components for success if you choose to utilize them,” said Moriah.

Committed to serving current and prospective students, she wants to assist anyone who feels the College may not be for them.

“A lot of people don’t return to school because they doubt themselves. I want to tell people it’s never too late to get an education or to better yourself,” she said.