In The Media

Board hires Judith Gay, Community College of Philadelphia's vice president, for interim post

01/21/2021 - 3:14pm
The Erie County Community College has its first president — even if her tenure might be temporary. Judith Gay, vice president for strategic initiatives and chief of staff for the Community College of Philadelphia, was named interim president for the new college by a unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees Wednesday night. Gay's first day on the job will be Feb. 1. She previously served as vice president of academic affairs and interim president at the Community College of Philadelphia. Prior to her time there, she worked as a division chair for the Montgomery County Community College, which is also part of the commonwealth's system of public community colleges.

First class of city-funded 'Catto scholars' starts semester at Community College of Philadelphia

01/21/2021 - 3:11pm
PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — When Community College of Philadelphia begins a new semester on Tuesday, it will welcome its first class of “Catto scholars.” The scholarship, named for a 19th century civil rights leader, is a city-funded effort to increase access to higher education. Darrel Claiborne has a plan: two years at community college then on to Temple University for nursing. He figures it’s his best chance to provide a better life for his two sons, but the margin on his investment is razor thin. “You never know what’s going to happen. Your car could break down or you might have a hard month where you’re not going to be able to afford food, especially trying to focus on school,” he said. So he was thrilled to be selected for the brand-new Catto Scholarship, which provides last dollar tuition, books, food, transportation and housing support — a CCP survey showed...

They lived in rental cars for a year. Now, these students have the Christmas present they wanted most.

01/07/2021 - 2:35pm
“We used to go to hotel rooms when we could afford them to try to keep us warm, keep us clean,” said Johnson. To get the wireless access Holly needed to complete his schoolwork — he’s a semester away from completing an associate’s degree in criminal justice at Community College of Philadelphia — they would sit in a parking lot. To charge their devices, they relied on the generosity of a woman who let them use her porch outlets. Holly, who has dreams of becoming a lawyer, saw his grades slip after becoming homeless. “I can’t work and drive the car and do my schoolwork at the same time,” Holly said. “Everything was so difficult.”

During COVID-19 pandemic, student struggling with housing obtains apartment, accepts college scholarship

01/07/2021 - 1:38pm
Liam Spady had already come a long way by the time the COVID-19 pandemic hit this spring when the sudden lockdown put his future once again into the throes of uncertainty. The 22-year-old college student who had been "couch surfing" was taking courses at a community college in Philadelphia when the college closed its campus due to the pandemic. He lost his study space, his cafeteria, his access to Wi-Fi and plentiful power outlets. Like many people struggling with housing, he said he relied on these public spaces to survive.

Philadelphia College Builds Auto Training Tech Center

11/30/2020 - 12:46pm
Nov. 23, 2020— The Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) is underway with the building of a new center focused on preparing students for careers in the automotive industry, according to KYW Newsradio. Ground broke on the $34 million project last week. The center is expected to serve as the main training loaction for the college's transportation, advanced manufacturing and health care programs. According to recent renderings, the CCP's new center will feature classrooms and labs designed for study of transportation technology, helping students earn credentials from auto manufacturers. The program will also feature training on alternative fuels and heavy truck technology. Classes could begin to be held in the center as early as spring 2022.

Community College of Philadelphia breaks ground on new West Philly Career and Advanced Technology Center

11/30/2020 - 12:27pm
In its mission to provide its students with more high-quality training to enter the workforce and earn a living wage beyond graduation, the Community College of Philadelphia broke ground on Nov. 18 for a new Career and Advanced Technology Center in West Philadelphia. The $33.5 million facility located at 4750 Market Street is being financed using new market tax credits. They will be coming from a number of different sources including U.S. Bank, the Reinvestment Fund, Urban Research Park, and the state’s Department of Education and Redevelopment Assistance Capital Grant Program. Programs getting a boost in the new facility include those for transportation and logistics, advanced manufacturing and infrastructure, health care, and entrepreneurship and innovation.

Community College Of Philadelphia Laying Down Foundation For Future

11/30/2020 - 12:20pm
Mayor Jim Kenney and officials broke ground on the college's new Career and Advanced Technology Center in West Philadelphia.

Mikecia Witherspoon named Government Relations Officer at Community College of Philadelphia

11/16/2020 - 1:38pm
Community College of Philadelphia is pleased to announce that Mikecia Witherspoon has joined the institution as the College’s Government Relations Officer. Witherspoon will be instrumental in leading the development and implementation of legislative strategies that align with the College’s mission. She will collaborate with internal and external stakeholders and ensure awareness of public policy interests and actions. “We are excited to welcome Mikecia Witherspoon to the College,” said Dr. Donald Guy Generals, College president. “She brings valuable experience to a critically important role as we continue to work with our elected officials to provide the best possible College experience for our students.” Witherspoon comes to the College from the Philadelphia Mayor’s Office, where she previously served as Deputy Chief of Staff. In addition to her government relations experience, she has also worked as a Social Media Specialist for the Penn Institute for Urban Research.

Celebrating La Salle’s first-generation students

11/06/2020 - 5:46pm
Students, as the first in their families to pursue four-year degrees, share how La Salle continues to support them. The college experience challenges every student. For first-generation students, generally defined as those students whose parents did not obtain a four-year college degree, those challenges can be especially unique and sometimes daunting... La Salle University historically has maintained a commitment to enrolling and supporting its first-generation students. With first-generation students comprising 30 percent of its student body, La Salle typically exceeds the national average of 24 percent.

City of Philadelphia Partners With CCP to Create Scholarship Program

11/06/2020 - 5:26pm
Looking to improve success rates for local students, the City of Philadelphia has partnered with the Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) to establish the Octavius Catto Scholarship, which was named in honor of the civil rights activist and educator. For up to three years, the scholarship will provide students with last-dollar funding to cover the cost of tuition as well as offer financial support for other costs such as food, transportation and textbooks. Over the next five years, 4,500 students are expected to receive the scholarship. According to the scholarship’s website , to be eligible, students must: Hold a high school diploma, Commonwealth Diploma or GED from any Philadelphia high school, Pennsylvania state cyber charter school or home school. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and certify an Expected Family Contribution below $8,000. Attend Community College of Philadelphia full-time, which is equivalent to enrolling in at least...

New CCP scholarship launches, offering thousands free tuition

11/02/2020 - 12:57pm
PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Its launch was delayed by the pandemic, but Community College of Philadelphia is now offering free tuition through its new city-funded Octavius Catto Scholarship. The Catto Scholarship covers the tuition for qualified students to attend Community College of Philadelphia after other federal and state grants are applied. The city is funding the program with $5 million this year and $47 million over five years. Dr. April Voltz, who oversees the scholarship at CCP, expects up to 4,500 students to benefit over the next five years. "We do expect to work with about 500 students this first semester. And we expect that it will increase over the years of the grant," Voltz said. College president Guy Generals told reporters that each year 3,000 students drop out of CCP, because after paying tuition they can't afford books or to pay for transportation or child care. He said the...

Community College Of Philadelphia Holds Virtual Voter Awareness Event

10/22/2020 - 7:00pm
The discussion focused on a global perspective about American elections.

For a new Philly-trained nurse, upskilling changed her life

10/20/2020 - 1:27pm
When Marie Gates was 7, her family moved from Trinidad to Philadelphia. She grew up in Olney, dreaming of working in the fashion industry. But after her son was born, she decided to become a medical assistant and moved to New York. The job paid just enough for her to get by. “I wasn’t struggling,” she explains, “but I was living paycheck to paycheck. I was always making a little too much for food stamps.” She began to worry about the future for her son. One day, a doctor where she worked told her she would make a great nurse. Inspired, Gates began looking for schools that would allow a flexible schedule so she could keep working while taking classes. She found that the nursing program at Community College of Philadelphia would not only accommodate her schedule, it was affordable compared with other schools. Although it took her a year...

Community College of Philadelphia cancels classes on Election Day to promote student voting

10/06/2020 - 11:39am
Community College of Philadelphia has canceled all classes and will close on-campus facilities on Nov. 3 to maximize student voter turnout on Election Day. So far, CCP is the only college in the Delaware Valley to fully cancel classes that day. Drexel University announced it will end the day early, at 2 p.m. CCP’s president, Donald Guy Generals, decided instead to turn Election Day into a day of service for students to be civically engaged. “We’re taking an out-of-the-box approach from the classroom, professor-to-students curriculum,” said Michelle Lopez, who manages CCP’s Institute for Community Engagement and Civic Leadership. “We feel for our students, because if they feel connected to the recent injustices that are happening right now, we want them to feel empowered that they can make decisions around things that can correct these large systemic issues.”

Community College of Philadelphia, the Urban League of Philadelphia to Host Virtual Voting Rights Panel

09/22/2020 - 11:50am
Contact: Megan Lello Email: mlello@ccp.edu Institutions team up on National Voter Registration Day to prepare community for upcoming presidential election; Mayor Kenney to provide welcome remarks PHILADELPHIA – On National Voter Registration Day, celebrated today, Tuesday, Sept. 22, Community College of Philadelphia and the Urban League of Philadelphia will host a virtual voting rights discussion, “Voting in 2020.” The event is part of CCP Votes, a multi-year civic initiative designed to engage students in the community and the electoral process. Panelists will address a variety of topics including voter registration barriers, mail-in ballot options, and changes in polling locations. Voter suppression will also be addressed as participants learn how to create a voting plan and make their voices heard. Panelists and speakers include Dr. Donald Guy Generals, College president; Mayor Jim Kenney; Andrea Custis, president and CEO, the Urban League of Philadelphia; Omar Sabir, commissioner, City of Philadelphia; Ashley Session,...

Community College of Philadelphia to Continue Online Learning in the Spring

09/18/2020 - 5:32pm
Online learning will continue for the Community College of Philadelphia in the spring 2021 semester, the school announced Tuesday. “As we head into fall and winter, there still remains a high risk of community transmission of COVID-19 in Philadelphia,” CCP President Dr. Donald Guy Generals said. “And while we hope the situation significantly improves by spring, we want to err on the side of caution to keep our students and the rest of our city safe, much as we did for the fall semester.” CCP will have a limited number of in-person credit classes and noncredit workplace development programs that require face-to-face settings. These classes will be on a case-by-case basis with safety measures strictly enforced however.

Community College of Philadelphia officials announce spring 2021 classes will be held online

09/18/2020 - 5:19pm
PHILADELPHIA - If you are a student at Community College of Philadelphia, your spring 2021 classes will primarily be online, repeating the fall 2020 semester, school officials announced Tuesday. College President, Doctor Donald Guy Generals, made the announcement in the hopes an early decision helps students plan for classes around schedules which include full-time jobs and childcare, part-time jobs or caring for aging family members.

Tracing the coronavirus: Students at Community College of Philadelphia are working to help stop the spread

09/16/2020 - 9:41am
Tyshien Maddox had seen what the coronavirus could do: His mother got it. So did his two brothers and his grandparents. And a cousin died from it. So when Community College of Philadelphia, where he is a student, asked whether he would be interested in working for the city’s Department of Public Health as a contact tracer, he was all in. “Anything I can do to help out and let people know this is real,” said Maddox, 38, of West Philadelphia. “It was very scary for us.” Maddox is one of 13 CCP students working among the city’s 80 contact tracers. They call known contacts of coronavirus patients, warn them about possible exposure, check on their health daily, and ask them to quarantine.

Magic 8-Balls, mini golf and trivia: 5 cool apps created by middle schoolers

08/26/2020 - 2:54pm
In line with citywide efforts to get students from underrepresented backgrounds into STEM, for a few weeks this summer, Philly middle schoolers learned algebra readiness and coding skills via Community College of Philadelphia’s summer STEM Academy. Rising seventh and eighth graders participated in two sessions of a virtual learning academy that combined live instruction with prerecorded sessions. From July 20 through 30, students participated in “Minecraft World.” The session centered around popular video game Minecraft which was used as a way to introduce concepts related to math and coding. The second session from Aug. 10 through 20 was called “#AwesomeApps” and saw students coding ideas into mobile apps via MIT App Inventor. After creating the apps, students pitched them in a showcase on Thursday. Here’s a look at what a handful came up with: Malika S.’s mobile app is a Magic Eight-Ball simulator. Malika coded her app so that by...

Community College of Philadelphia presents college science experience for middle schoolers

08/26/2020 - 1:51pm
PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — A summer camp focused on science, technology and math just wrapped up at Community College of Philadelphia. But the campers weren't college students. They weren't even high school students. It was the school's first STEM camp for middle school students. About 50 seventh and eighth graders took part in the four-week STEM Academy Virtual Summer Camp. Kids were taught math in the online morning sessions, then they worked in Minecraft and did coding in the afternoon. Students presented their creations Thursday at an online "Demonstration Day." Malika Staton, a seventh-grader at Friends Select, created a Magic 8 Ball app. "When you open the app, you will see the Magic 8 Ball. And when you shake your phone, you will hear a clinking teaspoon," she said. "You can press on the Magic 8 Ball and ask some questions and it’ll answer them in random order."

Dr. Mellissia Zanjani named vice president of institutional advancement and executive director of the Community College of Philadelphia Foundation

07/29/2020 - 4:03pm
Community College of Philadelphia is pleased to announce Dr. Mellissia Zanjani, CFRE, as the college’s vice president of institutional advancement and executive director of the Community College of Philadelphia Foundation. Dr. Zanjani leads the Institutional Advancement Office team’s efforts to strengthen and enhance alumni engagement, friend and fundraising events, annual giving, major and capital giving, and planned estate giving in support of scholarships, programs, facilities, equipment, and areas of greatest needs.

College students wondering about next school year amid coronavirus pandemic

07/09/2020 - 6:46pm
Dr. Kim Dean, Assistant professor at Arcadia University's School of Education joined local new anchors to discuss the benefits of attending community college while the Coronavirus pandemic continues to force Universities to prohibit students from returning to campus. Community College of Philadelphia is shown through video footage, reminding viewers and students who are anxious about paying full tuition for online classes that Community College of Philadelphia provides quality education at a fraction of the cost.

Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Scholar is featured on WURD, along with 10KSB Business Coach Frannie McNeal

07/08/2020 - 11:43pm

MaST/CCP MC2 dual enrollment program graduates its first African American student

07/07/2020 - 5:35am
Imari Hearst is an example of who our ancestors dreamed of as they toiled, bled, and died for better living conditions in America. Those ancestors knew something, despite the constant messaging to the contrary — we are a brilliant people. This young lady created history at MaST Community Charter School in Philadelphia by graduating from college with an associate’s degree before graduating with her high school diploma! I spoke with Imari, it was clear that she has a sense of purpose which goes beyond what others thought she could do, and she aims to exceed her own high expectations. SUN: Imari, you have accomplished much in a short period of time. What are you most proud of in this moment? IH: As I move on to the next chapter of my life, I am proud to say I was the first and only African American so far to complete the...

Dana Chanel And Prince Donnell Share Advice On Accountability, Faith And Self-Love

07/07/2020 - 5:28am
"Not gonna lie, I wasn't ready at all. I was a 20-year-old dude who just started my career as a personal banker with my life, accident and health insurance license and making $60,000 per year," Donnell admits to xoNecole about his mental preparation for a serious relationship. "I moved into my own apartment, got my own car and I had a few extra dollars on my check every two weeks after bills. To be honest, I felt like I made it." After living what he thought in his mind was his best life with having his friends in and out of his apartment every day and a fair share of friendships with various women, he soon came to realize that his life would change after meeting his wife with whom he shared the same alma mater, Community College of Philadelphia. "I remember her third time visiting my apartment and she...

CCP president on Covid-19 challenges and the school's role in the fight for racial justice

07/07/2020 - 5:20am
Donald "Guy" Generals said the school isn't just trying to prepare students for the post-pandemic economy, it also needs to take a "leading role" amid the fight for racial justice.

They said his name How George Floyd changed a city 1,100 miles away

07/07/2020 - 5:18am
Demonstrations spanned the city. In Fairmount, a young black protester sat atop a car, wearing a cap and gown. “You can take my life,” the 2020 Community College of Philadelphia graduate declared, “but you can’t take my degree.”

CCP plans to host public dialogue on racism, policing and the path forward

07/07/2020 - 5:13am
PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Community College of Philadelphia President Guy Generals says “enough is enough.” He believes it's time that the city had a frank discussion about racism in America, so the college is arranging an online “teach-in” and town hall. Generals said he thinks about the racism that permeates our modern-day culture daily. As a black man with three sons, he said the death of George Floyd evoked the fear he lives with every day. “It's a real anxiety that I have, that something comparable to what has happened to far too many African-American men and boys could happen,” he said. CCP is organizing an online town hall to talk about racism and justice. Generals said the panel will include members of the college's Black Studies program and possibly representatives of the Philadelphia Police Department. “We're trying to get a balance of voices and ideas so that it's an...

Invoking ‘change’, Council introduces ‘New Normal’ budget, advances housing bills

07/06/2020 - 6:11pm
The amendment to the revised FY21 budget bills would transfer the $25 million from the city’s recession reserve fund and focus on expanding job training. City money would be redirected to fund stipends for the Community College of Philadelphia and a plan to create “adult education learning” programs in every neighborhood.

Colleges in the Philly area and elsewhere are pledging to address national unrest and criminal justice inequalities

07/06/2020 - 6:05pm
At Community College of Philadelphia, educators and community activists discussed inequities in the criminal justice system, institutional racism, and the need to find solutions. “The importance of beginning the conversation and the dialogue in the current context is something that needed to happen and needed to take precedence over everything else we had planned in our lives,” CCP president Donald Guy Generals said during the 75-minute forum.

CCP sends three to four-year colleges on scholarship

06/30/2020 - 2:46am
Community College of Philadelphia has really developed an outstanding women’s college basketball program over the last three years. This year CCP has taken the program to another level sending three women to college on basketball scholarships and one to a Division I school. CCP head coach Kenyatta McKinney will send Cassandra Colon to the University of Toledo to play major college basketball. Elan Wali will be going to Southern Nazarene University, an NCAA Division II college in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and Kyirah Beckham will be heading to Edward Waters College, an NAIA school and a historically Black college and university in Jacksonville, Florida. McKinney is pleased with all his players going to college on athletic scholarships. Of course, Colon heading to Toledo is very impressive.

As the economy struggles, consider community college | Opinion

06/03/2020 - 3:35pm
Rather than giving up, most [students] persevered through a disrupted spring semester. In fact, many have taken the next step and signed up for summer classes — also all being offered online and via a remote format. They know what they want, whether it is a certificate, a professional development course, a two-year degree, or credits that can be transferred to another institution. They know that waiting to pursue what they want can lead to more debt and delayed earnings, and they will not be deterred — even by a pandemic...The lesson to be learned from community college students is to not let a year go by without making educational progress. Preparing for the post-pandemic future should be a top priority. During this period of personal uncertainty — related to home life and finances as well as those like on-campus living arrangements and tuition costs — the best decision is...

Generals: Octavius Catto Scholarship is transforming lives

06/03/2020 - 3:26pm
A proposal that makes possible a community college degree without the burdens of costs or loan repayments is an idea that should make every Philadelphian proud. Today, 24 states offer a version of free tuition for either their community colleges or, in some cases, their two- and four-year institutions. Removing the barriers to a community college education has become a national imperative and is consistent with the needs of an advanced economy. According to the Lumina Foundation, 60 percent of all jobs will require a post-secondary education by the year 2025. We are currently at 40 percent.

Community College of Philadelphia will start fall with online classes

05/28/2020 - 7:23pm
The Community College of Philadelphia became the first college in the region to announce it would start the fall semester with online classes. Some face-to-face courses, particularly labs or those that require hands-on instruction, may be allowed later in the fall if the circumstances surrounding the virus change, the school said. College president Donald Generals made the announcement to faculty and staff during a virtual town hall on Tuesday. The college, which enrolls about 25,000 full-time and part-time students annually, is largely a commuter campus. Generals called online classes the “safest and best educational option for the fall semester."

Community College Of Philadelphia To Open Fall Semester With Online Classes

05/28/2020 - 7:05pm
As the City of Philadelphia takes its first steps to return to some kind of normalcy, the Community College of Philadelphia has announced that it plans to open the fall semester with online classes. College President Dr. Donald Guy Generals made the announcement during a virtual town hall meeting with faculty and staff members on Tuesday. However, the college says that if circumstances change, some in-person classes may be offered later in the fall semester. “Given the continuing uncertainty regarding long-term COVID-19 forecasts, Community College of Philadelphia has decided that online classes are the safest and best educational option for the fall semester,” Dr. Generals said in a statement. “We are making this decision now to allow faculty adequate time to develop the best remote-learning strategies and to allow students to begin making plans for the fall semester.”...Dr. Generals also said that the college will continue its laptop loan program...

Octavius Catto Scholarship: transforming lives through education

05/19/2020 - 3:35pm
The Octavius Catto Scholarship embodies the central themes of Community College of Philadelphia’s mission: access, opportunity and student success. The Catto Scholarship will ensure access and opportunity for more Philadelphians than ever, but their success as students is what’s most important. Student success is not limited to college admission. Summative success will be defined by the number of graduates in the job market making livable wages and the number of graduates who transfer to one of the great colleges or universities in the Philadelphia area. It will further be defined by the number of students able to lift themselves and their families out of poverty. To achieve success, students will be supported by dedicated faculty, advisers, counselors and innovative curricula. The Octavius Catto Scholarship reflects and extends the long history of this nation’s willingness to invest in education as a means for addressing burgeoning societal needs. Public policy has consistently...

Trans activist chosen as CCP’s 2020 commencement speaker

05/19/2020 - 9:57am
Kendall Stephens, a Black, transgender leader in the local trans community and one of PGN’s People of the Year in 2019, was selected as the student speaker for Community College of Philadelphia’s (CCP) 2020 commencement. Stephens is graduating from college with an associate’s degree in behavioral health and human services. She plans to continue her education by studying public health at Temple University on a full scholarship. “From clubs and organizations, student programming and student leadership, [Kendall] has been extremely active in a variety of different ways,” said Richard Kopp, CCP’s assistant dean of students in the Academic and Student Success Division. “Not only [has she been] active and involved, but oftentimes [she] led the charge on many of the initiatives that she’s been involved with.” Stephens has indeed been very active in the CCP community. She served as president of the newly revitalized LGBTQ+ club, which runs out of...

Local urologist and alum CCP retires after distinguished career

05/14/2020 - 6:58pm
Urologist Dr. Joseph Williams has retired after 40 years of treating patients. Williams officially wrapped up his career on April 30th from MidLantic Urology, where he specialized in diseases of the bladder, kidney and urinary tract. And while he’s going to miss his colleagues and patients, he said the time has come for him to retire. “It’s been a great journey,” Williams said as he reflected on his time in medicine. “I enjoyed it very much. But it comes a time when you have to say enough is enough.” The native of Albany, Georgia didn’t initially aspire to become a urologist. He grew up in Philadelphia’s West Oak Lane section and graduated from Olney High School. Williams transferred college credits he earned at Community College of Philadelphia to Temple University, where he earned a pharmacy degree.

Kevin Hart, Stephen Curry and Serena Williams Celebrate Class of 2020 amid Coronavirus Pandemic

05/01/2020 - 10:36am
“You just got thrown a major curve ball, but ultimately that curve ball makes you better,” Hart added, referring to the pandemic. “These future leaders of tomorrow and today will say I was around through the pandemic, and I graduated. And after that it made me think about finances, life management and the things that are important. Your hindsight will just be different.” Hart later joked that he'd tell the class of 2020 to “be better than I was" after saying he dropped out of the Community College of Philadelphia after just two weeks. “Me and you are in the same court, right Steph?” Hart said, laughing. (The basketball star attended Davidson College for three years before opting out of his senior year.)

Here’s how 6 Philly-area colleges are celebrating graduation amid the pandemic

05/01/2020 - 10:18am
The Philadelphia region has no shortage of colleges and universities, and thousands of students graduate into the city’s various workforces every year. But in March, as many schools turned to virtual instruction to finish out the semester, many graduating seniors were left wondering about what springtime commencement would look like. “I’ve seen many students, especially seniors, express their sadness about spending the rest of their time in college in online classes,” Technical.ly editorial intern Marybeth Gerdelmann wrote last month . “The change came quick. Not all students can thrive in an online learning environment .” Now, college seniors are taking finals online and wrapping up Zoom meetings for the semester while job hunting for the first time during a pandemic . Most of these students will officially “graduate” in the coming weeks, but have no clue if or when they’ll get to don a cap and gown and walk across...

CCP Nursing Class of 2020 to host online graduation party, Mayor Kenney to participate

05/01/2020 - 10:14am
Due to social distancing guidelines, Community College of Philadelphia was unable to host its traditional nurses pinning ceremony, planned for May 1, 2020. So graduates will together in spirit via a 2020 Zoom online graduation party. Mayor Jim Kenney will offer congratulations along with CCP President Guy Generals, Dr. Tamika Curry, an assistant professor of Nursing, and surprise guests. The 96 graduates are among the first Nursing students in the area to complete their coursework. The Class of 2020 has faced unthinkable heartbreak and challenges such as job loss, the death of a classmate, illness and the transition to online learning. Three members of the class-many of whom were working jobs as licensed practical nurses or aides in nursing homes or health agencies-tested positive for the novel coronavirus and completed some classwork online while in quarantine. Like past graduates, most are likely to end up with jobs in the City...

Community College of Philadelphia donates six ventilators, plus life-saving personal protective gear to local hospitals

04/24/2020 - 11:43am
Three health care programs at Community College of Philadelphia have donated life-saving equipment to local hospitals to support health care facilities and their colleagues working on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Respiratory Care Technology program, the Biomedical Equipment Technology (BMET) program and the Nursing program at CCP have donated either ventilators or personal protective gear, both of which are in short supply and used to treat patients with the novel coronavirus. The Respiratory Care Technology program has donated four ventilators and one BiPAP, which is a less invasive type of ventilator that helps patients keep breathing. The program uses the equipment to help students prepare for their upcoming respiratory therapy clinicals in hospitals. The BMET program donated its ventilator as well. Students in that program learn how to test and repair the medical equipment used in hospitals. The technicians play a vital role by taking care of the...

Online Learning, Hybrid Classes and Virtual Reality: Philly Universities Prepare for a Risky Fall Semester

04/24/2020 - 11:40am
Schools in the Philadelphia area are already resigned to the potential for a combination of online and in-person instruction this fall. Shannon McLaughlin Rooney, a spokesperson for the Community College of Philadelphia, says the school is planning for “multiple possible scenarios,” including “fully in-person classes, hybrid classes with a mix of in-person and online instruction, and fully remote classes.”...For its part, the Community College of Philadelphia has already convened an administrative group to work on a plan that will focus on online learning and technological advances in the short term and permanently, Rooney says: “Regardless of how this pandemic continues, we know the shift to technology-based education will accelerate.”

Can hands-on career and tech programs go online during school shutdowns?

04/03/2020 - 11:19am
At the Community College of Philadelphia, campuses are closed through at least May 6, and all spring semester courses will be online. Putting lectures online isn’t a big concern, said Theresa Grady, who directs the school’s dental hygiene program. The problem is the required clinical practice. Even 20 years from now, applied dental hygiene won’t be taught virtually, Grady said. “You need to see different patients’ mouths, the anatomy of the mouth,” she added. “Virtually you’re not going to learn how to deal with a difficult patient.” A student in a nurse assistant vocational tech program near Atlanta takes part in an exercise for class. With colleges closed, students in nursing and other medical fields are being left without opportunities to acquire clinical experience and credits. Credit: Terrell Clark for The Hechinger Report Grady said her plan for now is to add extra clinics once campus reopens, even if that...

The Wistar Institute signed the lease for its 8,000-square-foot Discovery Center

04/03/2020 - 10:26am
“Wistar will curate this mix of innovative organizations in a dynamic scientific environment,” said Heather Steinman , VP of business development and head of tech transfer, in a statement. “We also see the opportunity to provide critically needed shared resources and a talent training pipeline program similar to our successful Biomedical Technician Training Program which is already supporting growing companies in Greater Philadelphia.” Wistar already relies on industry connections, especially for its technician training program for Community College of Philadelphia students to get training in life-sustaining jobs in the sciences: The program has operated for 20 years and late last year, the Institute told Technical.ly that it often works with biomedical companies Invisible Sentinel and Integral Molecular , both located in the University City Science Center , on their needs and desirable qualities and skills for its students.

College degrees and what they're worth

03/31/2020 - 10:50am
We looked at thousands of academic degrees to see what graduates across the region earned in their first year out of school, along with what they owed in federal loans. English majors at the University of Pennsylvania took home $29,300 their first year after college, while rhetoric and composition majors at state college Shippensburg University made more, earning $36,500 right out of school. Both were beaten by new dental hygienists with a two-year associate’s degree from the Community College of Philadelphia, who made $47,900. These are some of the findings from an exclusive Inquirer online search tool that looks at thousands of academic degrees and what graduates across the region earned in their first year out of school along with what they owed in federal loans. It’s a new way for students and parents to see what they are paying for and assess their ability to repay loans.

Kendall Stephens: improving Philly, one person and one college class at a time

03/20/2020 - 5:09pm
Kendall Stephens has pushed through adversity, giving her deeper insight and a quiet strength that she weaves into college courses and daily life. “We claim our power,” she says. “When we are affirmed, it begins the healing process.”... Now just months away from earning her associate degree in Behavioral Health/Human Services, Stephens balances a full roster of community work and coursework. She serves on several advisory boards, including CCP’s LGBTQ Center, the Mazzoni LGBTQ Health Center and the William Way LGBTQ Community Center.

Happy Hour College Radio Tour

03/20/2020 - 5:06pm
In celebration of Black History Month, Philadelphia Radio station, WURD hosted a satellite broadcast, live from The Coffeehouse in the Winnet Student Life Building. " Happy Hour on WURD is an evening show at WURD Radio where millennials (aged 18-35) talk about the most empowering and innovative happenings in Philadelphia and beyond. It’s a young, fresh perspective on solutions to issues and life." During this College Tour stop, WURD host DJ A-List spoke to Dr. Generals, members of the Woman' and Men's basketball teams, Patrick Robinson, Tamisha Hardy, Tamika Jackson, Ayanna Washington and Dr. Linda Powell about job training, career readiness and entrepreneurship opportunities.

After going viral, Taqueria Morales is keeping up

03/20/2020 - 5:04pm
While Elizabeth hits the books at a Center City charter school, Daniela, a beneficiary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy, does the same at CCP in her time outside the taqueria. “I want to be a child psychologist, but I actually like to write, which is my first passion,” she says. One day, she might even put her family’s story down on paper — one that social media, in all its engineered ephemerality, could never dream to tell as well.

CCP Student Launches Movement “I Buy Black”

03/20/2020 - 5:03pm
Medina Oyefusi learned about the restaurant industry after she became a host at a restaurant and jazz bar in Fairmount. She learned about coordinating large gatherings by participating in Obama’s Organizing for America in 2012, and she discovered her event-planning skills while working for the National Society of Black Engineer’s Temple University chapter. Then, Oyefusi began putting on a couple events a month at Green Soul, a large chic venue on Mount Vernon Street with a Southern-inspired but healthy menu. Now, she’s extending her influence. On Feb. 22, the 22-year-old college student, soft-spoken but ambitious, is holding her biggest event to date, I BUY BLACK TOO. It’s a restaurant and bar-crawl in greater Center City featuring four black-owned venues, live music and vendors. I t might seem like a lot for a 22-year-old who, by the way, is still taking classes at the Community College of Philadelphia . The annual...